Saturday, February 06, 2010

What Saturday's papers are saying


John Terry and fraudulent MP's make most of the front pages.

Grazie, Signor Capello: After days of dithering by the FA, it takes an Italian family man just 10 minutes to sack captain who shamed England says the Mail

Whilst the Sun reports that the Chelses defender,whilst gutted at the decision vowed to fight back whilst adding that he will lose up to £20million in commercial deals over the next four years after being axed as England captain.

The Mirror claims he was in tears after being sacked whilst reporting that he paid his former lover £800,000 to keep quiet.

The settlement according to the Times,led the former lingerie model to attend a press conference yesterday afternoon in which Max Clifford, her publicist, declared that, despite six-figure offers, she would not be selling her story to a Sunday newspaper.

It leads with the news that three Labour MPs charged with theft over fraudulent expense claims aim to use parliamentary privilege to avoid trial

“We maintain that this is an issue that should be resolved by the parliamentary commissioner, who is there to enforce any breach of the rules.”


According to the Telegraph,

It is feared that the prosecution case against them could be delayed by months of legal wrangling over whether the MPs are right to assert that their actions are covered by parliamentary privilege


The Guardian leads with the latest installment of its campiagn against BAE who says the paper,agreed to pay out almost £300m in penalties, as it finally admitted guilt over its worldwide conduct, in the face of long-running corruption investigations.

The sanction came as the UK ended its six-year investigation of the company over allegations of bribery, and dropped charges of conspiracy to corrupt brought last week against an Austrian count accused of being a BAE agent.says the Telegraph

Eurozone crisis threatens recovery is the headline on the front of the Independent as it reports stock markets continue to fall as European policymakers again failed to reassure markets that the "contagion" could be contained. The crisis could push Europe, including the UK, into a "double dip" recession.

There is plnty of coverage of the problems at Toyota.The Guardian reporting that its response cameunder renewed attack tonight following an investigation which cast fresh doubt on the way this week's crisis was handled.

Meanwhile the Telegraph reports that Honda has become the latest car manufacturer to recall thousands of vehicles amid fears that one of its models could catch fire.

The Express leads with the doting father who murdered his wife and teenage daughter yesterday before driving away to commit suicide

Hugh McFall, 48, called police to confess to killing Sue, 55, and Francesca, 18, and then hanged himself in his office.
Francesca, who was an only child and former head girl, updated her Facebook pages at 10.16pm on Thursday, a few hours before her death. reports the Mail

The Times reports on Adrian Prout, a 45-year-old landowner from Gloucestershire,who was convicted of murder even though no body, nor any trace of his wife, has been found since her disappearance two years ago.

The Independent reports that the leader of the Baptist missionaries charged with trying to remove 33 Haitian children from the country illegally knew many of the so-called "orphans" still had living parents or other close relatives but tried to move them over the border anyway, her own lawyer, Edwin Coq, has claimed.

Finally many of the papers report on the latest American teaparty

600 delegates from all over the US descended on the cavernous Gaylord hotel to plot strategy says the Guardian

The Times describing it as a dark underbelly of xenophobia

The anti-Government, anti-Establishment movement, which has splintered in the past week with many boycotting this gathering, has billed itself as a revolution born of the widespread disgust at Washington and the way that the nation’s politicians are bankrupting America’s future.says the paper

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